Archive for November, 2003

Economics of file sharing

Friday, November 28th, 2003

An interesting, somewhat theoretical view supporting file sharing.

RED HERRING | The Business of Technology

Philip K. Dick

Friday, November 28th, 2003

I really need to go back and re-read a bunch of his stuff.

Wired 11.12: The Second Coming of Philip K. Dick

More copyright ideas

Friday, November 28th, 2003

A good interview with some more moderate ideas on copyright. Also mentions my friend Robert von Goeben.

GrepLaw | Jim Griffin on the Future of Music

Reusability

Friday, November 28th, 2003

I love finding new uses for old tech stuff.

New Startup Secret: Dumpster Diving :: AO

Unicycle of the future

Tuesday, November 18th, 2003

I want one of these!

Forbes.com: Hot Wheel

Buy HP Stock!

Wednesday, November 12th, 2003

A new way to store data on plastic sounds pretty cool – time to buy HP stock?

Science Blog – New memory device could offer smaller, simpler way to archive data

CVS homedir

Tuesday, November 11th, 2003

I tried (and failed) to do this once – this guy is much more organized than me.

CVS homedir

Mixing altruism and markets

Monday, November 10th, 2003

The Economist recomments this book:

Motivation, Agency and Public Policy: Of Knights and Knaves, Pawns and Queens examines the theory and practice of “quasi-markets” for public services. The book is short, accessible and profound. Drawing on theory, case studies and surveys of the literature, Mr Le Grand argues that the left is missing a trick. Market forces, he says, can often serve its goals better than the methods socialists and social democrats generally favour.

Economist.com | Economics focus

Everybody needs to learn to program

Sunday, November 9th, 2003

A moderately interesting article that echoes some of the thoughts I’ve had recently. Even better is the unusually well considered commentary on Slashdot.

Slashdot | Literacy: Natural Language vs. Code

Guardian Unlimited | Guardian daily comment | Smash the Windows

IPv4 not running out addresses

Tuesday, November 4th, 2003

Seems like IPv4 isn’t running out of space as fast as people think. We have anywhere from 15-25 years left at the current rate.

RIPE NCC – Registration Services

ISP Column – July 2003